The legal framework for the destruction of cultural heritage in Timbuktu during 2012-2013: What is the background for destruction of cultural heritage? (2/7)

Nanette Askholm BulowArticle, ReportLeave a Comment

The Bamiyan Buddhas today. Photo credit: DVIDSHUB via Foter.com / CC BY

Political instability The conflict in Mali is complicated in its origin and may be connected to political unrest in the state prior to the military coup on the 21st of March 2012. Significantly such unrest may be traced back to the insurgency movements in the 1990’s. The North of Mali is home to the nomadic ethnic group – Tuareg, who … Read More

The Ancient Art of Collecting

Marina LahowinArticle, What do you think?Leave a Comment

In 1925, archaeologists Leonardo Woolley was excavating in an ancient Sumerian city called Ur, located in present day Iraq. There he uncovered one of the oldest collections of antiquities in the Ennigaldi-Nanna’s Museum, believed to be from 530 BC. The museum contained a diverse collection of ancient objects from Mesopotamia dating back as far as 2058 BC. Still more incredible, … Read More

The legal framework for the destruction of cultural heritage in Timbuktu during 2012-2013: The manuscripts and shrines of Timbuktu (3/7)

Nanette Askholm BulowArticle, ReportLeave a Comment

11289929706_b492c9a2be_c

Historical Background The city of Timbuktu has carried significance since the 12th century and especially carried significance during the domination of the Songhay Empire from the 15th to the 16th Century. The city took great advantage of its strategic position and became a centre for both trade, scientific developments and as the heart of spiritual and Islamic thought in Africa. … Read More

The legal framework for the destruction of cultural heritage in Timbuktu during 2012-2013: Overview (1/7)

Nanette Askholm BulowArticle, ReportLeave a Comment

m3rxRfN
The military coup in Timbuktu in March 2012, caused the escalation of political and religious unrest in Northern Mali. The internal instability of the country soon caught the attention of the global public after two separate cases of destruction of cultural heritage in Timbuktu had occurred. The first of these events occurred in the summer of 2012 months after the ... Read More

Antiquities in the Art Market

Marina LahowinArticle, What do you think?Leave a Comment

Antiquities in the art market have long been a topic of controversy surrounding auction houses, museums, collectors and even governments. From looted antiquities making their way onto the shelves of respected institutions to auction houses being caught red handed with smuggled goods, the issue is unrelenting and without an easy solution. The antiquities market is considered to be a gray market, … Read More

The Proposed Bears Ears National Monument

Lillia McEnaneyArticleLeave a Comment

Prehistoric Granary overlooks Cedar Mesa. Photographer: Josh Ewing. Photo courtesy of the Bears Ears Intertribal Coalition.

On October 15, 2015, the Bears Ears Intertribal Coalition submitted a proposal for the designation of a new United States national monument to be called Bears Ears. The 1.9 million acre area of land holds over 100,000 archaeologically and culturally significant sites. Bears Ears’ sheer size, breadth of sites, and lack of protection for those sites, make it one of … Read More

Smithsonian Cultural Rescue Initiative & The Launch of the Conflict Culture Research Network

Lillia McEnaneyAnnouncement, Article, NewsLeave a Comment

Image_CCRN Launch

On June 23, 2016, the Smithsonian Cultural Rescue Initiative hosted “An evening of discussion about cultural heritage and human rights” at the Smithsonian American Art Museum and National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC. The event featured comments by Karima Bennoune (United Nations Special Rapporteur in the Field of Cultural Rights, Human Rights Council) and a screening of The Destruction of … Read More

Asia Week Raids Cast a Spotlight on Antiquities Trafficking in India

social media teamArticle, CommentaryLeave a Comment

India_Relief

Art auctions can be a source of nail-biting excitement with high prices breaking the record books. Yet, during the 2016 Asia Week in New York City, the headlines were dominated not by shockingly high sales, but by federal seizures of illegally trafficked Asian antiquities worth a combined estimate of $4 million. The seized artifacts were recovered as part of the … Read More

Cultural Property Laws: Why They Fail and How They Can Be Improved

social media teamArticle, Commentary2 Comments

Workers unload 2nd c .AD Roman sarcophagus

The destruction and looting of cultural heritage sites and antiquities is a pervasive problem in Iraq and, more recently, Syria, as both areas are plagued by wider political conflicts. Despite international cultural property legislation established to prohibit the destruction or theft of cultural heritage (including the 1954 Hague Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed … Read More

The Power of One, and Community in Protecting Cultural Heritage

social media teamArticle, CommentaryLeave a Comment

Three figurines from Anatolia, Badisches Landesmuseum, Karlsruhe, Germany

The looting of archaeological artifacts is an issue that affects us all, across the globe, with ramifications which go beyond an academic, institutional need for understanding our cultural heritage. They touch upon issues of local identity, community, and historical reconstruction, both for understanding the past, but also for considering our future. Likewise, the protection of cultural heritage, not only in … Read More